Monday, April 11, 2011

Cote d'Ivoire President surrenders.

After a election showed that that Alassane Ouattara had one the presidental election; Laurent Gbagbo, decided to hold onto power. The supporters of the two forces have clashed in protests and military maneuvers. But after months of contention, the former president Gbagbo has been captured.

"Cote d'Ivoire's Laurent Gbagbo has surrendered to the forces of presidential claimant Alassane Ouattara and is being held by them, the United Nations has said."-Aljazeera

This is only days after an "offer to surrender earlier this week by Gbagbo's top three generals was a "trick" to buy time, charged the head of U.N. peacekeeping Friday, according to AP."-Global Post

"Although he is holed up in a bunker at the presidential residence, his troops have regrouped and are well armed. They are launching a new fight against forces loyal to Alassane Ouattara, the internationally recognized winner of the November presidential election. Gbagbo's men are also fighting against the United Nations peacekeeping force and French troops."-Global Post

"After days of holding out, his compound was stormed by troops on Monday, according to Ivorian, French and U.N. sources. Gbagbo's refusal to accept that he lost a presidential election to Alassane Ouattara last year plunged the country into civil war. He was arrested "to stop these killings, this fighting," Bamba said, adding that he thinks the conflict will stop as news of Gbagbo's capture spreads."-CNN

The future of Cote d'Ivoire, is not entirely clear, but the capture of Gbagbo may mean the end of violence. If however military forces are loyal to Gbagbo, this may only be the start of a longer Civil war. For the moment, Gbagbo's capture may mean the end of violence.

The Student Insurgent will continue to monitor this situation as information is available.

Thanks to:
http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/africa/110408/ivory-coast-gbagbo-ouattara-united-nations

http://english.aljazeera.net/news/africa/2011/04/201141113442914400.html

http://www.cnn.com/2011/WORLD/africa/04/11/ivory.coast.crisis/index.html?hpt=T1

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